Category Archives: announcements

New Issue: Media:Culture:Policy

communication +1 is pleased to present:
Media:Culture:Policy

*Edited by Sean Johnson Andrews, Janice Peck, Gilbert B. Rodman, and Fan Yang (杨帆)*

The relationship between culture and policy has long been a major topic for media and cultural studies. With this issue, we hope to broaden the meaning of cultural policy, from policies that are explicitly regulating something we call the “cultural” (including media or traditional rituals or symbols) to include the practice of policy-making and the cultural legitimation of law and policy itself, regardless of the object or dimension of social life it regulates. The essays in this issue argue for (or at least accept) an understanding of policy as a cultural production representing certain ideological outlooks, and thus implicitly suggest that cultural policy studies should encompass a wide range of policies; at the same time, the essays are interested in the cultural mechanisms and means through which policies are promulgated and enforced – from think tanks to social media flak, from the global circulation of ideologies to the local practices of appropriation/resistance.

To the authors we extend our deep gratitude for their contributions. To the readers we extend our invitation for input and suggestions. The following pages begin a conversation we hope will continue. And it is to those whom have spoken we shall turn.

For free access to the issue, and all of communication +1, please visit http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

*Advisory Board*

Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Sean Johnson Andrews, Columbia College Chicago
Nathalie Casemajor, University of Québec Outaouais
Jimena Canales, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
Bernard Geoghegan, Kings College, London
Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
Peter Krapp, University of California Irvine
Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
John Durham Peters, Yale University
Gil Rodman, University of Minnesota
Florian Sprenger, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany
Johnathan Sterne, McGill University
Ted Striphas, University of Colorado, Boulder
Christina Vagt, University of California Santa Barbara
Greg Wise, Arizona State University

Editors:
Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Zachary J. McDowell, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

New Issue: Machine Communication

communication +1 is pleased to present:
Machine Communication

*Edited by David Gunkel and Zachary McDowell*

With this special issue we explore the boundaries of communication beyond the human subject and the restrictions of humanism by considering that which is radically other – the machine. These articles seek to interrogate the opportunities and challenges that emerge around, within, and from interactions and engagements with machines of all types and varieties. By examining the full range of human-machine interactions, machine-machine interactions, or other hitherto unanticipated configurations, we believe we have assembled a collection of ground-breaking essays that push the boundaries of our discipline and probe the new social configurations of the 21st century.

Contributors include:

Zachary McDowell
David Gunkel
Andrea Guzman
Anna Nacher
John Novak
Jason Archer
Victor Mateevitsi
Steve Jones
Sun-ha Hong
Samuel Goyet
Cléo Collomb
Sandra Robinson
Lisa Tam
Rajiv Khosla

To the authors we extend our deep gratitude for their contributions. To the readers we extend our invitation for input and suggestions. The following pages begin a conversation we hope will continue. And it is to those whom have spoken we shall turn.

For free access to the issue, and all of communication +1, please visit http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/.

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication

* Editor in Chief: Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst
* Managing Editor: Zachary J. McDowell, University of Massachusetts Amherst

*Advisory Board*

Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Sean Johnson Andrews, Columbia College Chicago
Nathalie Casemajor, University of Québec Outaouais
Bernard Geoghegan, Coventry University, United Kingdom
Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
Peter Krapp, University of California Irvine
Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
John Durham Peters, University of Iowa
Gil Rodman, University of Minnesota
Florian Sprenger, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany
Johnathan Sterne, McGill University
Ted Striphas, University of Colorado, Boulder
Greg Wise, Arizona State University

Directory of Open Access Journals

logo_croppedAfter five years and over 23,000 downloads, we have finally met a milestone that we have been working on for the better part of a year:

All of our content is now linked through the Directory of Open Access Journals.

This was an incredibly time consuming process, including an overhaul of our open access policy to update to international standards, a lengthly and time consuming application process, and a transformation of our back-end data to match their standards. With the gracious help of UMass Libraries and BePress, we have weathered this process and now all of our content is linked with DOAJ.

This is a huge step for us, as this will allow for all of our articles to be searched through multiple databases, increasing our authors’ exposure by many fold.

You can find our DOAJ page here: https://doaj.org/toc/2380-6109

Thank you all so much for your support, authorship, reviewing, editing, and readership. We could not have done this without the excellent community surrounding communication +1.

The Editors,

Zachary McDowell and Briankle Chang

 

New Issue: Occult Communications: On Instrumentation, Esotericism, and Epistemology

communication +1 is pleased to present: Occult Communications: On Instrumentation, Esotericism, and Epistemology

* Guest Edited by Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan *

What can the occult, the obscure, and the incommunicable teach us about the history of communications and culture? Occult Communications: On Instrumentation, Esotericism, and Epistemology (ed. Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan), the newly released issue of Communication+1, examines how spiritualism, esotericism, and occultism have shaped the dominant cultures of reason in European and North American contexts from the seventeenth-century until today. Case studies in media archaeology and historical epistemology on issues such as spirit photography, horror films, exorcisms, stage magic, surrealism, and brains-in-vats examine so-called magical thinking and its operations at the heart of modern scientific and technological reason.

Contributors includes Tessel M. Bauduin, Anthony Enns, Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan, Stephan Gregory, Christian Kassung, Petra Löffler, Margarida Medeiros, Simone Natale, Katherina Rein, Laurence Rickels, Erhard Schüttpelz, Jeffrey Sconce, Florian Sprenger, and Ehler Voss.

To the authors we extend our deep gratitude for their contributions. To the readers we extend our invitation for input and suggestions.

The following pages begin a conversation we hope will continue. And it is to those whom have spoken we shall turn.

For free access to the issue, please visit http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/.

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication

* Editor in Chief: Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst

* Managing Editor: Zachary J. McDowell, University of Massachusetts Amherst

*Advisory Board*

Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Bernard Geoghegan, Humboldt-Universität, Germany
Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
John Durham Peters, University of Iowa
Johnathan Sterne, McGill University
Ted Striphas, Indiana University
Greg Wise, Arizona State University

New Book Out Now: A Geology of Media by Jussi Parikka

New book out now: “A Geology of Media” by Jussi Parikka.

Media history if millions, even billions, of years old.  That is the premise of Jussi Parikka’s pioneering and provocative book, A Geology of Media, which argues that to adequately understand contemporary media culture we must set out from material realities that precede media themselves – Earth’s history, geological formations, minerals, and energy.

More information about the book on his site here.

More information at Minnesota University Press here.

New issue: Afterlives of Systems

* Guest Edited by Florian Sprenger and Christina Vagt *

Under the impression of today’s global crisis and the rise of ecological thinking, confronted with smart, ubiquitous technosystems and the impression of interconnectedness, there appears a new urge to excavate the remnants of the past. The articles of this issue suggest that in order to understand present technologies, we need to account the systems thinking that fostered their emergence, and that we cannot gain insight into the afterlives of systems without exploring their technologies.

The nine contributions ask how these debates and affective states survive and live on in today’s discussions of media ecologies, environmentalism, object-oriented philosophies, computer simulations, performative art, and communication technologies. In this sense, they take the renaissance of systems thinking in the late 20th and early 21st Century as an effect of various system crisis and explore new media technologies as stabilizing ‘cures’ against the dystopian future scenarios that emerged after World War II. The articles of this issue suggest that in order to understand present technologies, we need to account the systems thinking that fostered their emergence, and that we cannot gain insight into the afterlives of systems without exploring their technologies

To the authors we extend our deep gratitude for their contributions. To the readers we extend our invitation for input and suggestions.

The following pages begin a conversation we hope will continue. And it is to those whom have spoken we shall turn.

To access this issue please visit scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication

New Issue: Communication and New Materialism

communication +1 is pleased to present our second issue: Communication and New Materialism 

Given the recent emergence of new perspectives in critical theories, such as Object-Oriented Ontology, Speculative Realism, Alien Phenomenology, Flat Ontology, and associated research programs, this issue seeks to explore the implications of these perspectives for the study of communication and media. We use the term, New Materialism, broadly to include all the aforementioned as well as other related approaches in the hope to be as inclusive as possible and to encourage diverse voices and analytic angles that focus on the forms and processes of mediation across different fields. We are particularly interested in works that engage with the theoretical underpinnings of New Materialism to challenge the text-centered approaches in media and communication studies.

To the authors we extend our deep gratitude for their contributions.To the readers we extend our invitation for input and suggestions.

The following pages begin a conversation we hope will continue. And it is to those whom have spoken we shall turn.

To access this issue please visit scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/