Category Archives: cfps

CFP: Intersectionalities and Media Archaeologies

communication +1 is seeking proposals for Volume 7, “Intersectionalities and Media Archaeologies”

Edited by Zachary McDowell and Nathanael Bassett

The emerging field of media archaeology has opened up new avenues of research across fields and provided a way to challenge accepted historical layers of social and technical arrangements. Drawing from a variety of entangled theories and methodologies, bringing in German media theory, new materialism, digital humanities, software studies, cultural studies, Foucauldian frameworks, and others, media archaeology interrogates dead media, alternative technological schema, the composition of infrastructures, everyday objects, and other phenomena, providing new insights and recontextualization for scholars from an array of backgrounds. However, despite the interconnected promise of Media Archaeology, the practices and theories remain limited in their engagement with much of critical cultural communication and media studies.

In the introduction to “What is Media Archaeology,” Jussi Parikka notes that “we need to be prepared to refresh media archaeology itself.” This collection seeks essays by critical scholars of communication participating in this ongoing emergence of media archaeology as method or theorization to study mediums, objects, conjunctures, and other areas of interest to the study of communication.

This collection is meant to highlight and connect ways to theorize and “refresh” the concepts related to media archaeology in connection with the study of communication. We encourage intersectional engagements with and applications of media archaeological practices as they function theoretically, methodologically, spatially, institutionally, and in relation to the study of communication.

With this collection we hope to help provide communication researchers a space in which to explore the promise of media archaeology as a critical set of lenses in the study of communication.

Please submit short proposals of no more than 500 words by December 3rd, 2017 to communicationplusone@gmail.com.

Upon invitation, full text submissions will be due April 1st, 2017, with expected publication in September, 2018.

 

About the Journal
The aim of communication +1 is to promote new approaches to and open new horizons in the study of communication from an interdisciplinary perspective. We are particularly committed to promoting research that seeks to constitute new areas of inquiry and to explore new frontiers of theoretical activities linking the study of communication to both established and emerging research programs in the humanities, social sciences, and arts. Other than the commitment to rigorous scholarship, communication +1 sets no specific agenda. Its primary objective is to create is a space for thoughtful experiments and for communicating these experiments.

Editors
Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Zachary J. McDowell, University of Illinois at Chicago

Advisory Board
Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Sean Johnson Andrews, Columbia College Chicago
Nathalie Casemajor, University of Québec Outaouais
Bernard Geoghegan, Coventry University, United Kingdom
Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
Peter Krapp, University of California Irvine
Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
John Durham Peters, University of Iowa
Gil Rodman, University of Minnesota
Florian Sprenger, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany
Johnathan Sterne, McGill University
Ted Striphas, University of Colorado, Boulder
Greg Wise, Arizona State University

 

CFP –  Media:Culture:Policy

communication +1 invites submissions for its upcoming issue, Media:Culture:Policy.

Edited by Sean Johnson Andrews, Janice Peck, Gilbert B. Rodman, and Fan Yang

The relationship between culture and policy has long been a major topic for media and cultural studies, but we hope to broaden what we mean by cultural policy – from policies that are explicitly regulating something we call the “cultural” – including media or traditional rituals or symbols – to include the practice of policy-making and the cultural legitimation of law and policy itself, regardless of the object or dimension of social life it regulates.  In short, pieces in this collection would argue for (or at least accept) an understanding of policy as a cultural production, representing a certain ideological outlook, and therefore expect cultural policy studies to consider a wider range of policies; at the same time, it would be interested in the cultural mechanisms through which policies are promulgated and enforced – from think tanks to social media flak, from the global circulation of ideologies to the local practices of appropriation/resistance. In a sense, then, it is an understanding of policy that highlights its mutual constitution of and through culture. In the tradition of Policing the Crisis, it asks us to think about the dialectical process of cultural legitimation that is needed to make a set of policies seem reasonable and just, and the way that policies and laws then go on to determine the culture of the future. Media and communications are a central channel for these processes, making their regulation all the more important. Contributions to this collection would try to keep all three of these dimensions in mind as they explore a broader array of policy areas.

We welcome submissions that push at the traditional boundaries of cultural policy studies.  We are especially interested in exploring key areas of contemporary life as locations of that dialectic of culture, media, and policy and sites of political and social struggle, for example,

  • More conventional areas of cultural policy and media studies, such as work on copyright, open access, privacy, data mining, internet filtering, neutrality, surveillance, etc. in national and transnational contexts
  • Education policy, using a cultural legitimation approach (for instance Sandra Stein, The Culture of Education Policy).
  • Environmental policy, especially the cultural effects of the oil industry involvement in U.S. and global debates about climate change and the role of media in those debates.
  • Law/policing policy and the expansion of the carceral state/prison-industrial complex (e.g. Michelle Brown, The Culture of Punishment).
  • Health (physical & mental) policy, such as looking at the dramatic expansion of the pharmaceutical industry and corresponding explosion of bio-medical explanations for social & personal distress.
  • Transportation policy, especially the privileging of automobility in both “developed” and “developing” worlds.
  • Food policy as cultural policy – and the cultural representation of food from those in the commercial mass media to the role of the food industry in health research, as in the recent revelations over sugar research in the 1960s.
  • The relationship between urban policy and media representations in transnational locales, such as in the work of Steve Macek and Mike Davis.
  • Policies on other controversial recent policy areas, from tax breaks and welfare reform, to (im)migration, drone warfare, torture, and the “global war on terror.”
  • And the question of who has the power to make policy and how.

Please submit short proposals of no more than 500 words by December 19th, 2016 to communicationplusone@gmail.com. Review the overall C+1 submission guidelines for relevant information: http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/policies.html

Review of submissions will be complete by late January, with invitations sent shortly after.

Upon invitation, full text submissions will be due April 10th, 2017, with expected publication in September 2017.

About the Journal

The aim of communication +1 is to promote new approaches to and open new horizons in the study of communication from an interdisciplinary perspective. We are particularly committed to promoting research that seeks to constitute new areas of inquiry and to explore new frontiers of theoretical activities linking the study of communication to both established and emerging research programs in the humanities, social sciences, and arts. Other than the commitment to rigorous scholarship, communication +1 sets no specific agenda. Its primary objective is to create is a space for thoughtful experiments and for communicating these experiments.

For free access to the issue, and all of communication +1, please visit http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cpo/ .

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication

* Editor in Chief: Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst
* Managing Editor: Zachary J. McDowell, University of Massachusetts Amherst

*Advisory Board*

Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
Sean Johnson Andrews, Columbia College Chicago
Nathalie Casemajor, University of Québec Outaouais
Bernard Geoghegan, Coventry University, United Kingdom
Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
Peter Krapp, University of California Irvine
Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
John Durham Peters, University of Iowa
Gil Rodman, University of Minnesota
Florian Sprenger, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany
Jonathan Sterne, McGill University
Ted Striphas, University of Colorado, Boulder
Greg Wise, Arizona State University

For more information about the project in general, as well as short pieces, lectures, and interviews, visit communicationplusone.org.

For more information or to participate in the communicationplusone.org project, please email communicationplusone@gmail.com

 

CFP –  Machine Communication

communication +1 invites submissions for its upcoming issue, Machine Communication.

Edited by David Gunkel and Zachary McDowell

With this special issue we hope to explore the boundaries of communication beyond the human subject and the restrictions of humanism by considering that which is radically other – the machine. We seek articles that interrogate the opportunities and challenges that emerge around, within, and from interactions and engagements with machines of all types and varieties. By examining the full range of human-machine interactions, machine-machine interactions, or other hitherto unanticipated configurations, we hope to assemble a collection of ground-breaking essays that push the boundaries of our discipline and probe the new social configurations of the 21st century.
Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Algorithmic Culture – Influence of machines on human or other non-machine culture
  • Automation – Drones, Robots, or other automated systems that exist in the world and take part in a variety of tasks
  • Artificial Intelligence – Either the possibilities of AGI (artificial general intelligence) or more specific smart systems
  • Big Data, Deep Learning, Neural Networks and other recent innovations in computer science
  • The Internet of Things
  • Cybernetics, Bioinformatics, Knowledge Representation, or various applications of Software Theory.

Please submit short proposals of no more than 500 words by December 13th, 2015 to communicationplusone@gmail.com.

Upon invitation, full text submissions will be due April 5th, 2016, with expected publication in September, 2016.

About the Journal

The aim of communication +1 is to promote new approaches to and open new horizons in the study of communication from an interdisciplinary perspective. We are particularly committed to promoting research that seeks to constitute new areas of inquiry and to explore new frontiers of theoretical activities linking the study of communication to both established and emerging research programs in the humanities, social sciences, and arts. Other than the commitment to rigorous scholarship, communication +1 sets no specific agenda. Its primary objective is to create is a space for thoughtful experiments and for communicating these experiments.

communication +1 is an open access journal supported by University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries and the Department of Communication

Editor in Chief: Briankle G. Chang, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Managing Editor: Zachary J. McDowell, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Advisory Board

  • Kuan-Hsing Chen, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
  • Bernard Geoghegan, Humboldt-Universität, Germany
  • Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • David Gunkel, Northern Illinois University
  • Catherine Malabou, Kingston University, United Kingdom
  • Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • John Durham Peters, University of Iowa
  • Johnathan Sterne, McGill University
  • Ted Striphas, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Greg Wise, Arizona State University

For more information or to participate in the communicationplusone.org project, please email communicationplusone@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Afterlives of Systems

Call for Papers: Afterlives of Systems
communication+1, Volume 3, 2014
Guest Editors: Christina Vagt, Florian Sprenger

 This issue of communication+1 investigates the afterlives of systems since the early 20th century, following Aby Warburgs and Walter Benjamins historiographical concept of afterlife as the transformations and iterations a concept traverses to become productive at a specific moment in time. Under the impression of todays global crisis phenomena and the rise of an ‘ecological paradigm’ (Erich Hörl), we ask for papers that explore these afterlives from a historical or systematic perspective. We are interested in the promises, plausibilities and argumentative resources of system-oriented thinking, holistic or vitalistic worldviews and mechanistic approaches on different fields of knowledge during the 20th century and their current revival in the 21st century.

When system-oriented thinking emerged within biological contexts in the first half of the 20th century, it came along with universal pretensions: The concepts of ecosystems (Tansley) and general systems theory (von Bertalanffy) were both immersed in longstanding struggles between materialism and holism. From this context stemmed the rise of cybernetics and neocybernetics after the Second World War, which incorporated the principles of feedback and self organization (Maturana/Varela/von Foerster/Luhmann). System-oriented thinking in the once new fields of ecology, cybernetics, or systems theory itself seemed to offer an alternative to the futile opposition of mechanistic or atomistic perspective on the one side and holistic, organicistic or vitalistic perspectives on the other side. Nonetheless, underlying this institutionalization of system-oriented thought were diverse models of the relationship between a system and its parts, and alongside with that a renaissance of holistic concepts, e.g. holocoen (Friedrichs), biosphere (Vernadsky), noosphere (Teilhard de Chardin), synergetics (Buckminster Fuller), or Gaia (Lovelock).

How do these debates and affective states survive and live on in today’s discussions on new materialisms, object-oriented philosophies, media ecologies, or environmentalisms? Was the renaissance of holism in 20th century thought an effect of various system crisis, taking new media technologies such as television, computers, satellites and space shuttles as stabilizing ‘cure’ against dystopian future scenarios after World War II? Or should we understand the afterlives of systems within a broader perspective of new media induced models of subjectivity and agency that still have to be explored? Which role does the figure of the observer play in all this? Are there notions of systems in arts and architecture that are not incorporated in the historical struggles? What does it mean when materialisms today become holistic again? What is systemic in assemblages?

Please submit short proposals of no more than 500 words by November 25th, 2013 to afterlivesofsystems@gmail.com.

Upon invitation, full text submissions will be due March 31st, 2014, with expected publication in July, 2014. Although there is no set word limit, suggested length for the final submission is between 4500 and 7000 words.